Beauty and Elegance Entwined With Usefulness in Parasols

Grace from the yesterday years is back to adorn you and the fashion of modern times. What’s even better is that it offers great protection against the worst enemy your skin has ever had – the sun. Parasols are back with a big bang and offer a stylish way to enjoy the sun in the summers. Women have begun to realize the importance of parasols in saving their most prized complexion and looking fashionable and great at the same time.

It’s not at all difficult to pamper yourself with one of these delicate and useful wonders for yourself. The wide variety of parasols available in the market ensures that you get what you want in terms of style and statement. They complete the look of a pretty summer dress and strapped sandals. It is easy to be carried away by their beauty. For example, the lacy parasols that are reminiscent of the fair English skin might not offer a lot in terms of protection but are great as fashion accessories. They might just be the right thing when you want to flaunt the vintage look. An elegant parasol will enhance your appearance, especially if you are aiming for an old world charm.

The more protective parasols come in a variety of makes and materials. The cloth made parasols offer versatile choice in terms of cotton, nylon and silk of various kinds. If you are looking for the most durable and inexpensive parasols, nylon made parasols should be your choice. They would be apt for daily use. Some women love parasols that offer frills and other embellishments while many prefer straight and plain looks as they can be matched with anything. One thing is for sure that you will be spoilt for choices when it comes to colors and materials of parasols.

Silk made parasols come with delicate paintings or other interesting handwork. They are great for giving an elegant and posh look. The paper made is generally associated with the Japanese and the Orient. You can almost visualize one beautiful eye gazing at you from under the simple allure of the wooden parasol. The paper woven into the wood is generally painted with flowers highlighting the feminine charm of the woman carrying it. Their usefulness in protection of skin and hair makes them a must-have for any woman who needs to step out in the sun and still wants to look her interesting best.

A Review of Oil Painting Brushes: Which Brush Is Best for Oil Painters?

The hairs used for good quality oil painting brushes are stiffer and taper differently than the natural hairs used for watercolor. Where the sables, horse, squirrel, ox, or goat hairs in watercolor brushes tend to be longer in taper and more supple, hairs from hogs, boars, badger, weasel, and mongoose are better for the more heavy bodied oil paints. Let’s take a look at each.

The Kolinsky sable hair, especially the female golden brown hair, is used for oil painting brushes. These hairs are a bit stiffer than the tail hair of the males and have better snap and resilience. The true Kolinsky sable was banned from import to the U.S. in 2014. Today, Kolinsky sable actually comes from the Siberian weasel. The hairs are harvested from the tail of the males. This ban came about because sable martens where pure red sable comes from do not do well in captivity. The only way to harvest the hair was through trapping. Thankfully, that is now banned.

That’s both good and bad news for the artist. Good the little critters’ lives are saved, bad that these super high quality brushes are no longer available. But, the tail hair of the male Siberian weasel still makes a very fine — and more affordable brush. Because manufacturers had back stock of Kolinsky sable, you may still be able to occasionally find some on the market. But when they are gone, they are gone. You will have to travel out of the country to purchase them legally, since the ban was for export to the U.S. only.

Hog bristles. These are by far the best hairs for oil painting brushes. They hold a good paint load. They spread the paint uniformly. They blend the paint well. The best bristle comes from hogs in the Chunking region in China. On better quality brushes, the bristles are arranged in an interlocking fashion with the bristles curving inward. Hog bristle is naturally split at the ends and arranged thus they hold paint well and spread it around nicely. Cheaper bristle will have stiffer hairs, be arranged more erratically, and may turn both inward and outward making the brush look fuzzy.

Horse or pony hair is typically used in cheaper natural hair brushes and marketed for different kinds of paint use. Although sometimes sold as oil painting brushes, they are better for acrylics and watercolor, but are used more in student grade brushes and cosmetics. In terms of cost, they are cheaper than squirrel.

Badger hair, due to its shape being thinner at the root and fatter at the tip, makes for a bushier brush. Oil painters like these for blending.

Weasel and a close relative, fitch, hair are very resilient with long conical shapes. Although close in quality to red sable, they are not quite as supple making them better for oils than for watercolor.

Mongoose hair is strong and resilient with good pointing. But they are better for oils for this reason since they are not fine enough for watercolors. They are difficult to find sometimes.

There are a number of synthetics on the market in several brands that are designed for both oils and acrylics. As with the natural hair brushes, you need to try them until you find one that fits your style of painting and feel in your hand. From a cost standpoint, synthetics are less expensive. You can see many of these brushes, natural and synthetic, and touch before you buy, in better quality art supply stores.

Better brands that are easy to find are Winsor & Newton, Grumbacher, Princeton, Simmons, and Liquitex, to name a few.

One last tip: brushes will last longer if you always pull, never push, your brush across the painting surface.

Career Opportunities in Picture Making

Picture making is one of the prestigious branches of visual arts. There are countless career or job avenues that are readily available in the field of picture making. All these career opportunities provide numerous financial gains that can help learners cater for themselves and their families. Some of these wonderful job prospects have been discussed below.

Advertising consultant: He is an expert in the field of advertisement of products and services. He is usually consulted to give technical advice on the right form of advertisement to choose for a particular product or service.

Interior Decorator: He is an artist who decorates the interiors or inner parts of buildings such as homes, offices, churches and other public buildings in an artistic fashion especially during occasions like weddings etc.

Landscape Painter: He is a picture maker who make painting on canvas and other materials depicting activities on land such as market scenes, festivals etc.

Print maker: An artist who is skilled in printing and engages in the printing of projects. He implements the various printing technologies in producing prints on T-shirts, banners, cups etc.

Gallery Owner: An owner and/or caretaker of an art gallery (a room or series of rooms where works of art are exhibited). He oversees the selling and trading of the works of art in the gallery.

Curator: An art historian who serves as a custodian in charge of an art museum or centre where there is a great collection of artefacts such as paintings etc.

Computer Animator: An artist who is an expert in the use of the computer in the creation of moving pictures for making films and movies.

Cartoonist: He designs satirical or humorous pictures and scenes (cartoons) for use in magazines, journals, newspapers etc.

Book Illustrator: He makes illustrations in books to explain the printed text or content of the book.

Picture making tutor: He instructs students in the field of picture making in educational institutions.

Exhibition Designer: An artist who plans and organizes an exhibition. He is responsible for the designing of the layout and arrangement of works art at the chosen site for the exhibition.

Event Promoter: An artist who promotes events through the designing and making of visual communication tools such as banners, posters, flyers, T-shirts etc. to promote a special upcoming or ongoing event such as a sporting activity, entertainment etc.

Muralist: He paints scenes and pictures on the walls of public buildings, homes and offices as a form of decoration.

Mosaic Artist: A picture maker who composes pictures by the use of small cubes of shiny stone, glass or coloured papers assembled or arranged to form the picture.

Museum Educator: An artist who instructs people on objects and artefacts having scientific or historical or artistic value in a museum.

Portrait Artist: He draws and paints the exact likenesses of people and other sceneries. Usually such works are laminated or encased in wood or plastic frames with a glass plate to be hanged in rooms and offices as a form of decoration.

Stage Designer: He is responsible for the designing, arrangement and decoration of stage for theatrical performances in a theatre.

Product Designer: He designs products for firms and industries before they are produced.

Tourism Developer: An artist who produces artworks or joins other artists in developing a tourism base for art.

Industrial Designer: An artist who designs products for an industry. He may be employed to be in charge of all the designing of artistic products for the industry.

Colour Psychologist: An expert in colour theory who knows the psychological or mental effects of colours on people. He is consulted before some particular colours are selected for various tasks by institutions especially health and mental institutions.

Art Therapist: A person skilled in the use of art as a form of therapy or medicine for curing mentally deranged and emotionally disturbed patients.

Art Historian: An artist who is well versed in the histories concerning the arts of various groups and people across the world.

Art Critic: An expert in the critiquing or evaluation of works of art for competitions and examinations. He also reviews various works of an artist and writes detailed commentaries on each of them for publication in journals and leading newspapers.

Art Director: The director in charge of the artistic features of a theatrical production (costumes, scenery and lighting).

Art Consultant: An expert in art who is usually consulted by firms, industries and institutions to give technical advice on decisions related to art such as choice of colours, emblem or logo etc. of the institution.

Art Collector/Trader: A person who collects several artefacts and trades in them.

Art Administrator: He is a manager of the art department of an institution who is responsible for all decisions relating to art.

Archivist- A person in charge of collecting and cataloguing archives (A depository containing historical records and documents).

Enrolling in the field of picture making as a field of study is very rewarding. Senior high school students who would want to further their education in the field of art can consider reading courses in picture making since it will furnish them with the requisite skills for their career development.